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Don't buy dark sheets or comforter

Discussion in 'Hosts' started by Matt S, Jun 3, 2015.

  1. Sandy

    Sandy Active Member

    Oui! It is an electronic toilet that washes you. Very hygienic. Unusual at first, but we decided after being in Japan a while that they were the best thing ever. Who would wipe their hands with a tissue if they could wash them? Same with the other end. Refreshing and awesome. It is adjustable in all kinds of temps, strengths, streams, directions and everything from a little wireless controller. Haha, it's a funny discussion. But I do like these things you discover other countries are more advanced in. Also when you become geriatric, no one else has to do that for you (not that I M planning for that already!).
     
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  2. Estuarto

    Estuarto Active Member

    This thread is going in the toilet ;)

     
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  3. Matt S

    Matt S Active Member

    This raises a lot of questions in my head. This eliminates using hands all together - right? Saying as the device looks like it's in the toilet, I would think the water wouldn't be the cleanest. I know it's not the toilet water but it's in the toilet. What about drying? I don't see a dry feature.
     
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  4. Sandy

    Sandy Active Member

    Lol Matt. This is going further down the drain than I expected! That's an old model for sure. It does have a drying feature, but I still pat dry, because it's like a warm hair dryer on your bum and I'm too impatient.

    The water that comes out is not toilet water. It comes from a little motorized sprayer that stays tucked away until you turn it on, and then it comes out of its hideyhole, spraying clean water from the plumbing connection, exactly the same as the tap you wash your hands in. All perfectly hygienic. Imagine getting stuff like that on your hands, and expecting dry toilet paper to clean properly. You wouldn't dream of it. A good washing does though! Feels great. You'll never go back. It's one of the things I miss most other than my bed when traveling. That's how I originally thought to mention it.

    Oh I forgot one of favorite features. Warm toilet seat in the winter!
     
    Matt S likes this.
  5. Estuarto

    Estuarto Active Member

    Thanks @Matt S for asking about drying, I wanted to know but was afraid to ask.
     
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  6. KonaCoconutz

    KonaCoconutz Active Member

    Back to the subject of linens and laundry in general, I agree with Sandy. no dryer. If you live in a place where you can hang, that's the best. In fact I hang all laundry because dryers ruin things.

    Like many hosts I have several sets of linens for those back-to-back days. As for color, I can't do light. They get stained too easily. I've taken to trying sheets with patterns that hide the stains better. But even these look like crap after a while. I did buy an all black set recently and I like the way it's performing, although as all black I expect it will start to fade soon. By the way, 100% Cotton should not get lint on it, even if you wash it with towels.. Matt are you using the dreaded microfiber? If so, it will catch all the lint and start pilling in no time. Stick with cotton!

    I get my sheets at Macy's or Kmart. I wait for a white sale and then I buy. Our Macy's here in Hawaii often carries the tropical bed in bag sets. These are a good option because they include the shams and bedskirt. Sheets are the thing you will go through the most of and have to replace the most often.

    Changing sheets is the grossest thing, so I ask guests to strip the bed when they check out and leave the laundry in a basket. Then I don't have to touch it, I dump it right in the washer! Most guest comply readily with my check out rules. We don't have trash service out here in the country so I ask them to take their trash with them. Some don't but most do. On average, my guests are very courteous upon check out. I ask them to leave the room as they found it.
     
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  7. KonaCoconutz

    KonaCoconutz Active Member

    I used these in Japan and they are Awesome. The dryer doesn't dry "everything" so paper is still offered, LOL. Once you've had a luxury throne, it seems barbaric to go back to Stateside poopers, LOL. I noticed the souvenir shops carried these and they weren't badly priced. It's just, well, it would not fit too well in a suitcase. LOL. One feature I noticed that was cool was that you can turn on music, chimes or flushing sounds so that you wouldn't have to listen to the sounds of your own eliminations or bother neighboring stalls with your tinkling. LOL too funny . Oh, and they have a flush knob for #1 and one for #2! Water saving feature apparently. However sometimes you walk into a Japanese restroom expecting luxury and you get an Asian toilet, basically a basin set right on the floor that you (as a lady) have to squat into. I called those the squattie potties. :) takes getting used to. So one minute you have a world class heated seat with air dryer and directional spray and the next minute you are trying not to piddle on yourself in a squattie pottie! Oh and you better use the loo before you leave the station because very few restaurants in Japan have facilities.

    In Korea, you are lucky in public to find a regular toilet. In some of the older buildings you have to bring your own paper and throw it in a trash can provided lest you clog their plumbing. There is an intercom that you have to use if you clog it and a janitor will come assist. bathrooms in Asia are an experience! I am totally serious!!
     
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  8. Estuarto

    Estuarto Active Member

    Thanks for bringing us back on topic. Hawaii! I am jealous. I don't have the patience to dry sheets using any other method then the dryer. I try to find sheets that have patterns because those are the most likely to hide stains. I have gotten some good deals off ebay, and generally go with a $20 or so set. I also recently got some on sale at Target for $15 that are ok. I have 3 sets for the guest room that gives me some time for them to pile up before I start the washing mania.
     
  9. Estuarto

    Estuarto Active Member

    Right back into the toilet! They sell them at the souvenir shops!! I can just see the look on my sisters face when I bring her home a Japanese bidet for a souvenir...
     
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  10. KonaCoconutz

    KonaCoconutz Active Member

    Tip: Buy it at a duty-free shop (take your passport with you while shopping) and make sure to get one wired for U.S. voltage. I actually think I was in Akehabara (the girnormous anime, hobby and electronics district of Tokyo) at one of the electronics stores when i saw it displayed front and center. So must be a popular item. Can you imagine writing that on your customs form upon returning to the U.S.: One Hygienic Toilet. buwahhahahahahhhhhh.
     
    Matt S likes this.
  11. KonaCoconutz

    KonaCoconutz Active Member

    I know it seems like more work to hang dry but really it isn't... it's saving energy too! Hey did you hear that joke about using the latest solar- powered clothes dryer? It's called the SUN! LOL. I know it sounds cheap and bad, (but keep in mind I am a budget place by the beach) but I have found all-cotton Canon queen size sets at Kmart on the clearance shelf for $8.99. Kmart also has great prices on kitchenware and dishes. Our Kmart here in Hawaii is wayy nicer than the Walmart so I patronize them first. Ross also has deals at times.
     
  12. Matt S

    Matt S Active Member

    I would ideally line dry everything. Problem is I don't have the best space for doing so. Also I think here in LA the sun will bleach fabric pretty quickly. It's surely fading my skin!

    I checked and my sheets are mostly this brand that is 60% cotton and 40% polyester.
     
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  13. KonaCoconutz

    KonaCoconutz Active Member

    Matt, I know if you are living in the city, space is definitely an issue (I'm a UCLA grad so LA was once my stompin grounds!) Here in Hawaii things get dry instantly, and I have one of those fold up racks that college students have as well as a line under the lanai eves. I've also been known to throw towels over the lanai to dry as well.

    Interesting side note... when I stayed with friends in England I was fairly shocked that they had no dryers there and said no one did. So they were hanging clothes all over the house to dry and on the radiators too! Funny!

    So your sheets are a blend... I think that's cheaper but on average they don't last as long as cotton. Good maybe next time to invest a bit more in all cotton sheets.
     
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  14. Matt S

    Matt S Active Member

    I will have to figure a way to be creative with potentially drying in the house. I had thought to get a rack before but the ones I have seen would only accommodate 1 sheet at a time. I will try to get 100% cotton next time and try those out. Although I'm guessing the cotton ones take longer to dry comparatively.
     
  15. Estuarto

    Estuarto Active Member

    You are lucky in Hawaii to have an abundance of your solar-powered clothes dryers.
     
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  16. Sandy

    Sandy Active Member

    Ah Matt. That'll be why you're having the fluff sticking to your linens (if it's the duvet too). Polyester, especially that high percentage creates static electricity, where everything just ends up sticking to it. Impossible to get off sometimes. The other problem with sheets with poly is they really cause you to sweat and stick to you. They don't breathe too well. I would be able to tell the second my fingertips touched the fabric. In Cali, I would definitely get some cotton sheets. You don't need to air dry. Good quality cotton lasts fine in the dryer, so long as you don't over dry. Damp drying is a fantastic way to get the best of both worlds, and ensure non crinkled sheets.

    I can suggest my super duper place for buying awesome linens at really cheap prices if you like. It will have to be in private though, because I can't have my special place turning out to be impossible to get the deals from in the future!
     
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  17. Matt S

    Matt S Active Member

    So even the comforter should be 100% cotton you are suggesting. And what is meant by damp drying?
     
  18. KonaCoconutz

    KonaCoconutz Active Member

    No, I doubt that many comforters are all cotton (Sandy correct me if I am wrong?) One thing you could do because you are in California is head over to IKEA and buy a cheap down quilt... then some inexpensive duvet covers. Then just wash the duvet covers! I forgot all about IKEA. Wish we had one in Hawaii.

    Damp dry is a setting on your dryer that won't overdry your load and ruin it.

    Sandy, PM me with your super duper place, although they probably charge a fortune to ship to Hawaii!
     
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  19. KonaCoconutz

    KonaCoconutz Active Member

    Sandy... don't forget also, that poly sheets and the microfiber we are flooded with lately starts "pilling."
     
  20. Shirey

    Shirey Member

    The comforters I have are 100% cotton outside and say 30% down/70% Dacron for the insides. I believe Dacron is synthetic down material?
     
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